Participating Faculty

James Nagler

James Nagler

Department:Biological Sciences, UI
Credentials:1991 - Ph.D., Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
Office:Life Sciences South 252
Phone:208-885-6280
Fax:208-885-7905
Mailing Address:University of Idaho
Biological Sciences
PO Box 443051
Moscow, ID 83844-3051
E-mail:jamesn@uidaho.edu
Website:Click here


Research Interests

Fish Reproduction Biology

Research Summary

The Nagler Laboratory studies how the environment interacts with reproduction in fishes. A major ongoing study is a partnership with the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) to understand the reproductive physiology of iteroparity in wild, female steelhead trout (steelhead). The main objective is to investigate reproductive performance in female steelhead that elect to consecutively spawn or “skip” a year before spawning again. This research is being conducted as part of a steelhead reconditioning program at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, in conjunction with CRITFC. Laura Jenkins, a doctoral graduate student candidate, is working on the steelhead project and has been studying life history diversity and the proximate cues that signal entry into a spawning cycle (or not). A second research project, being conducted by MS student Christine Trahan, is examining estrogen receptor subtype function in rainbow trout liver cells using gene knockdown methods.

Research Publications

Pierce AL, Blodgett JW, Cavileer TD, Medeiros LR, Boyce J, Caldwell LK, Bosch WJ, Branstetter R, Fast DE, Hatch DR, Nagler JJ (2016) Reproductive development in captive reconditioned female steelhead kelts: evidence for consecutive and skip spawning life histories. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 10.1139/cjfas-2016-0065.

Jia Y, Cavileer T, Nagler JJ (2016) Acute hyperthermic responses of heat shock protein and estrogen receptor mRNAs in rainbow trout hepatocytes. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Part A 201:156-161.

Gillies K, Krone SM, Nagler JJ, Schultz IR (2016) A computational model of the rainbow trout hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary-liver axis. PLOS Comp. Biol. DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004874

Medeiros LR, Elliott M, Nagler JJ (2015) Stressor timing, not cortisol magnitude, is an important embryo viability determinant in female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. J. Fish Biol. DOI:10.1111/jfb.12846

Cavileer T, Hunter S, Olsen J, Wenburg J, Nagler JJ (2015) A sex determining gene (sdY) assay shows discordance between phenotypic and genotypic sex in wild populations of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 144: 423-430.

Washington State University